Mets Lose To Padres In Ninth 2-1

I’ll cut right to the chase. Scott Schoenweiss blew up in the bottom of the ninth. And I was getting worried that Aaron Heilman was warming up in the bullpen. Little did I know…

Schoenweiss walked two, then an intentional walk, and then hit Paul McAnulty with a pitch to bring home the winning run. What a horrible way to lose a game.

Jose Reyes made a couple of really nice plays in the field. He also went 2 for 3 with two stolen bases.

Mike Pelfrey was pitching out of trouble in most of his six innings. He gave up eight hits and three walks while only giving up one run. His line looks better than he actually pitched.

The Mets only run came in the sixth inning when Jose Reyes singled, stole second base, then scored on a single by David Wright.

Terrible loss. The Mets go to 2-2 on the road trip and one game over .500.

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4 thoughts on “Mets Lose To Padres In Ninth 2-1

  1. thebloggersbeat

    I can honestly care less about Reyes’ “tap-dancing,” which did not cause for him to score the run – he would’ve scored the run if he had both feet on second-base waiting for Wright’s hit. Reyes is supposed to distract the pitcher, so it’s not something that surprises me. The bigger picture is how they lost by walking 3-batters in 1-inning, with the last batter being the winning run. And it wasn’t just any kind of walk – the guy hit the batter for their winning run. Unacceptable. The loss goes to Willie and Schoeneweis. Yes, Willie did not throw 4-straight balls after going-up 0-2 in the count to walk the first-batter. And Yes, Willie did not become walk-happy during the most important spot. Nevertheless, Willie did make the call for No-Show Schoeneweis to enter the game during the ninth-inning. The Padres brought on their closer to pitch the ninth, so where was our ace closer – Wagner? Did Willie sit Wagner because he pitched a few-outs the game before? If so, than are you telling me that a pitcher of Wagner’s caliber – and a game of that importance – didn’t call for our best bullpen pitcher?I’m slightly confused with Randolph’s mentality, so if someone can explain his thought process, than I’d be much appreciative.

    1. Dave Doyle

      I agree wholeheartedly. In a tie game, in the bottom of the ninth, you can't walk the first two batters and stay in the game. That was a bad job by Willie. I really thought that he was going to let Schoenweiss do the intentional walk, then take him out. I was shocked that Randolph left him in to face McAnulty. Admittedly, I was petrified that Heilman would blow another game but Schoenweiss clearly didn't have it and needed to come out.

  2. thebloggersbeat

    I can honestly care less about Reyes’ “tap-dancing,” which did not cause for him to score the run – he would’ve scored the run if he had both feet on second-base waiting for Wright’s hit. Reyes is supposed to distract the pitcher, so it’s not something that surprises me. The bigger picture is how they lost by walking 3-batters in 1-inning, with the last batter being the winning run. And it wasn’t just any kind of walk – the guy hit the batter for their winning run. Unacceptable. The loss goes to Willie and Schoeneweis. Yes, Willie did not throw 4-straight balls after going-up 0-2 in the count to walk the first-batter. And Yes, Willie did not become walk-happy during the most important spot. Nevertheless, Willie did make the call for No-Show Schoeneweis to enter the game during the ninth-inning. The Padres brought on their closer to pitch the ninth, so where was our ace closer – Wagner? Did Willie sit Wagner because he pitched a few-outs the game before? If so, than are you telling me that a pitcher of Wagner’s caliber – and a game of that importance – didn’t call for our best bullpen pitcher?I’m slightly confused with Randolph’s mentality, so if someone can explain his thought process, than I’d be much appreciative.

  3. Dave Doyle

    I agree wholeheartedly. In a tie game, in the bottom of the ninth, you can't walk the first two batters and stay in the game. That was a bad job by Willie. I really thought that he was going to let Schoenweiss do the intentional walk, then take him out. I was shocked that Randolph left him in to face McAnulty. Admittedly, I was petrified that Heilman would blow another game but Schoenweiss clearly didn't have it and needed to come out.

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